YOUNG LDN ARTISTE NAMED ADAMÉ. SOME OF MY WORK IS DISPLAYED HERE. FOLLOW SHARE AND SUPPORT ME THROUGH MY ARTISTIC JOURNEY. PEACE.. FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM: ADAMANTRA / TWITTER: HERMESXO / MERCI
Visitor Counter
Visitor Counter
  • THOUGHTS&QUESTIONS
  • nicolezai:

    If I dont respond to your insult it means what i wanted to say was too mean and I decided to let you live

    romanerol:

fuckyeahpaganism:

In Irish mythology, the Púca is a mischievous, shapeshifting faerie who would assume a disguise in many forms, including a horse, rabbit, goat, goblin, dog, calf, or donkey. Most commonly, the Púca is disguised as a sleek, black horse, with burning yellow eyes and an untamed, wild mane. It is among the most frightening Faeries is some parts of Ireland, and is said to scatter livestock, break fences, and cause damage to property as well as harm humans. Although It seems to have a bad reputation, If they acquire a liking to a certain human, they will often offer advice and be a generally kind faerie. The origins of the Púca is unknown, but there is some speculation that the name could have origins in Scandinavia, the name being related to “pook” or “puke” meaning “nature spirit”. 

Woah
    te-pai:

typicalcatss:

so much power in that statement

fckng virgins
    "I wonder if this is how people always get close: They heal each other’s wounds; they repair the broken skin."
    Lauren Oliver, Pandemonium  (via
    dieworten)

    (Source: wordsnquotes.com, via misakiyasu)

    heavyheavyboots:

    salahmah:

    Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.

    The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).

    Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 

    TAKE ME THERE

    (via misakiyasu)

    nicolezai:

allthinqsdrake:

ESPYS 2014

Ok?
    +